• Clark-Skamania Flyfishers

  • Instructions for Grant Proposal Preparation and Submission


  • Clark Skamania Flyfishers (CSF), a non-profit, tax exempt organization located in Vancouver, Washington, is dedicated to the preservation of wild trout and salmon and to the promotion of fly fishing as a method of angling, particularly among youth.

  • CSF provides grants in amounts starting at $100 for activities consistent with its Mission Statement, with particular emphasis on issues (and an awareness of those issues) that impact fisheries in the Pacific Northwest, and the promotion of fly fishing in SW Washington.

  • Letter of Inquiry (not essential)
  • Individuals and organizations interested in submitting a grant proposal to CSF are strongly encouraged to first send a brief letter of inquiry, by email, to the club's Secretary with a copy to the President (email addresses available here). This letter should:

  •   (i)  provide details about the submitting organization, and
  •   (ii)  outline the scope of the project;
  •   (iii)  its timeframe (one- or multi-year);
  •   (iv)  its geographical location;
  •   (v)  total budget;
  •   (vi)  the amount being requested from CSF.

  • Your letter, which should not exceed one page in length and contain no images or maps, will be reviewed and feedback will be provided in a timely manner.

  • Full Proposal
  • A full proposal can be submitted only by an officer of the organization seeking funding from CSF. The proposal should include:

  •   (i)  a completed Grant Application Form (available here);
  •   (ii)  a brief description of the submitting organization, the nature of its work, and a brief summary of the organization's achievements, particularly as they relate to the problem or issue for which you are requesting funding
  •   (iii)  a statement of the problem or need you plan to address and an explanation of how it will be addressed. Include a brief description of the methods to be employed and the anticipated achievements or outcomes. Also, please indicate if performance-based, project-specific monitoring will be performed upon completion;
  •   (iv)  a description of the scheduled activities and time period.

  • Note: Items (ii) through (iv) should not exceed 3 pages in length.

  •   (v)  a detailed budget;
  •   (vi)  a statement of how any CSF funds will be used. Applicants should be aware that CSF places some restrictions on how its funds can be used. (See below);
  •   (vii)  detailed information about other sources of funding for the project (both anticipated and committed). If private fund raising is an option, the names of individuals being approached should not be included;
  •   (viii)  any maps or graphical material that is important for conveying the nature of the project;
  •   (ix)  if the applicant has previously received funding from CSF, a brief outline of the project and how CSF funds were used in that project should be included.

  • Completed proposals should be submitted as a single PDF file by email to the President of CSF (email address available here).

  • Timetable
  • The CSF Board of Directors meets monthly (with the possible exception of July and August), at which time they may review submitted grant proposals. To ensure that a proposal comes to the Board's attention in any given month, it should be received no later than the first week of the month in question. Proposals received after that date will not be reviewed until the following month.

  • Exclusions
  • CSF does not provide grants to individuals (except student scholarships), organizations outside of the United States, or colleges or universities (except when some aspect of their work is an integral part of an established, recognized conservation program).

  • CSF funds can be used for capital costs and specific projects including land acquisitions, material and labor used in conservation, education and community outreach efforts. The club generally does not fund ongoing operations and salaries that are not an integral part of the project in question.

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